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Coverage of the 2017 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage of the 2017 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic infections (CROI 2017), February 13-16, 2017, in Seattle.

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage by topic

CROI website

4/16/17

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CROI 2017: Better Depression Care Could Improve Outcomes for HIV Treatment Programs

Improved management of depression and other mental health problems has the potential to improve the outcomes of HIV treatment programs, Pamela Collins of the U.S. National Institute of Mental Health reported at the recent Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections in Seattle. Mental health treatment should be integrated into HIV services in resource-limited settings, she said.

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CROI 2017: Stopping Smoking Cuts Risk of Some Cancers Quickly in People with HIV

Smoking probably contributes far more to the risk of cardiovascular disease in people with HIV than antiretroviral drug choice, viral load, or any factor linked to the virus, but stopping smoking leads to a rapid reduction in the risk of some cancers, according to results from a cluster of studies presented at the 2017 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections last week in Seattle.

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CROI 2017: Bone Density Improves in People Who Switch from Tenofovir DF to Tenofovir Alafenamide

After 3 years, tenofovir alafenamide (TAF) for first-line HIV treatment was better at suppressing viral load and safer for the bones and kidneys than the older tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF), researchers reported at the 2017 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) last month in Seattle. Another study showed that people with low bone density who switched from TDF to TAF saw improved bone health, including a reduction in osteoporosis.

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CROI 2017: Treatment or Watchful Waiting for Cervical Abnormalities in Women with HIV?

Close monitoring of earlier-stage cervical abnormalities (CIN-2) may be preferable to treatment for many women with HIV, a U.S. study suggests. The findings, presented at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections this week in Seattle, show that CIN-2 regressed in over three-quarters of women taking antiretroviral therapy, without the need for CIN treatment. A higher CD4 count was associated with a lower likelihood that lesions would progress.

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CROI 2017: Long-Term Darunavir/Ritonavir Modestly Increases Risk of Cardiovascular Disease

Long-term use of the boosted protease inhibitor darunavir (Prezista) modestly increases the risk of cardiovascular disease, according to data from the ongoing D:A:D study presented to the recent Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections. Investigators identified an independent association between cumulative use of the drug over 5 years and heart attack and stroke.

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IDWeek 2016: Comorbidities Are Common and Rising Among People with HIV

People living with HIV are increasingly experiencing a range of non-AIDS-related comorbidities as the population ages, including cardiovascular disease, kidney impairment, and bone loss leading to fractures, according to research presented at the recent IDWeek 2016 meeting in New Orleans.

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CROI 2017: Studies Look at Brain and Cognitive Changes in People with HIV As They Age

People with HIV often show persistent signs of cognitive impairment and abnormalities in brain structure despite suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART), but they do not appear to experience accelerated decline compared to HIV-negative people as they age, according to research presented at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections last month in Seattle.

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HIV-Positive People May Lose More Years of Life from Smoking than from HIV/AIDS

People with HIV on effective antiretroviral treatment who smoke cigarettes may incur more risk of death and reduction in life expectancy from smoking than from HIV/AIDS-related conditions, according to a study described in the November 3 advance edition of the Journal of Infectious Diseases.

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