Coinfection

Abacavir/Lamivudine Could Be Driving Liver Damage in People with HIV/HCV Coinfection

Progression of liver fibrosis among ART-treated patients with HIV/HCV coinfection is associated with the type of nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) "backbone," Canadian research published in the September 23 online edition of Clinical Infectious Diseases suggests.

alt

Read more:

IDWeek 2015 Features HIV and Hepatitis C Prevention, Treatment, and Cure Research

Immediate antiretroviral therapy is the big HIV news of the year and interferon-free therapy has transformed the treatment of hepatitis C despite its high cost, experts said during an overview of "What's Hot" in the field, presented at the IDWeek 2015 conference taking place this week in San Diego. Participants also heard a keynote talk by Ian Crozier, a doctor who survived Ebola virus disease.

alt

Read more:

IAS 2015: Fatty Liver May Contribute to Higher Risk of Death for HIV/HCV Coinfected People

About a quarter of HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfected people in a New York City cohort died over a 10-year follow-up period -- a "strikingly low" survival rate -- according to a poster presented at the 8th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment, and Prevention last month in Vancouver. Researchers saw trends toward an association between steatosis (fatty liver) and cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and overall survival.

alt

Read more:

Coverage of 2015 Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage of the 55th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC), San Diego, September 17-21, 2015.

Highlights of this year's conference include experimental antiretroviral drugs and treatment strategies, HIV prevention, and comorbidities among people with HIV and HIV/HCV coinfection.

Full listing by topic

ICAAC website

10/6/15

alt

IAS 2015: Accessing Hepatitis C Treatment [VIDEO]

While new interferon-free direct-acting antiviral therapy can cure more than 90% of people with chronic hepatitis C -- including those with HIV/HCV coinfection -- access to treatment remains a major challenge, experts said at a media briefing on HIV and hepatitis coinfection at the 8th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment, and Prevention last month in Vancouver.

alt

Read more:

Coverage of IDWeek 2015

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage of IDWeek 2015, October 7-11 in San Diego.

Conference highlights include new HIV therapies and treatment strategies, HIV and hepatitis C continuums of care, and comorbidities among people with HIV and HIV/HCV coinfection, as well as news about antibiotic stewardship and other infectious diseases including Ebola virus.

Full listing of coverage by topic

IDWeek website

10/9/15

alt

 

IAS 2015: PrEP and the Risk of Hepatitis C Virus Infection [VIDEO]

 Are gay and bisexual men who take Truvada for HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) at greater risk for sexually transmitted hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection? Experts discussed this issue and others at a media briefing on HIV and hepatitis coinfection at the 8th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment, and Prevention last month in Vancouver.

alt

Read more:

ICAAC 2015: Comorbidities and Mortality Among HIV-Positive and HIV/HCV Coinfected People

While illness and death due to opportunistic illnesses has declined, people living with HIV remain prone to comorbidities that contribute to hospitalization and reduced survival, according to presentations at the 55th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC) last weekin San Diego. Mortality is higher among HIV-positive people coinfected with hepatitis C virus (HCV), and is associated with liver fibrosis progression, offering further evidence supporting prompt hepatitis C treatment.

alt

Read more:

IAS 2015: Daclatasvir + Sofosbuvir Cures Most Coinfected People in French Compassionate Use Study

 Interferon-free treatment using daclatasvir (Daklinza) and sofosbuvir (Sovaldi), with or without ribavirin, was well-tolerated and produced sustained virological response rates of 95%-100% for HIV/HCV coinfected people with advanced liver disease, according to a presentation at the 8th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention (IAS 2015) last month in Vancouver. These results, from a French program that provides new drugs to patients in need of treatment prior to regulatory approval, demonstrate that outcomes in the "real world" can be as good as those seen in clinical trials of the new drugs.

alt

Read more: